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Proud ‘east London girl’ on going from ‘not A-level material’ to senior lawyer

A proud “east London girl” told at 15 she “was not A-level material” is now a Waltham Forest lawyer fighting for Windrush victims. Pauline Campbell’s […]By Waltham Forest Echo

Pauline Campbell, senior lawyer for Waltham Forest Council (Twenty Seven)
Pauline Campbell, senior lawyer for Waltham Forest Council (Twenty Seven)

A proud “east London girl” told at 15 she “was not A-level material” is now a Waltham Forest lawyer fighting for Windrush victims.

Pauline Campbell’s memoir, Rice & Peas and Fish & Chips, will launch at 1pm on 5th October at Waltham Forest Town Hall.

Pauline qualified as a lawyer at 41-years-old and is now a senior lawyer for Waltham Forest Council, who provides free legal advice to victims of the Windrush scandal through the borough’s Windrush Reach programme. 

Her book, which is “part memoir, part commentary”, “uncovers modern Britain’s structural racist past” but also chronicles her journey to “discovering her own identity [and] sense of belonging”.


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One day a Judge stated to me in open court: “Oh Ms Campbell you do drop your H’s don’t you.” And I replied with pride: “That’s because I was born in ‘Ackney hospital Sir”

She told the Echo: “My generation has come a long way from being born in 1960’s Britain and the journey has at times been challenging. 

“Now 50 years on… Rice & Peas and Fish & Chips is my tribute to our parents who came here in the hope of giving us a better life.”

The launch event will feature a short speech from Pauline and will be attended by Waltham Forest mayor Elizabeth Baptiste. 

The book will be available in stores in hardback from 7th October. It is published by Hackney-based imprint Twenty Seven, which launched in May this year to “champion breakthrough voices”.


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